IOC on two wheels for final mile as bike show goes electric

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Photo of MCIA boss Tony Campbell with Carl Lomas, Tracey Worth and Karen Cole talking two-wheel for commercial mobility compliance from L zero to L3, electric assist to cargo bike. Photo of MCIA boss Tony Campbell with Carl Lomas, Tracey Worth and Karen Cole talking two-wheel for commercial mobility compliance from L zero to L3, electric assist to cargo bike.

Fifteen hundred quid for electric two-wheel scooters brand new.

Micromobility - IOC at the NEC Birmingham for everything two wheel at the Motorcycle Live bike show.

Electric everywhere, from traditional brands to newcomers on the block, lightweight scooters starting at fifteen hundred quid points to the answer to final mile city density delivery issues.

The new term on the block is PLVs - Powered Light vehicles.  'L zero' L category are the solution to last mile delivery.

The NEC bike show lived up to its reputation for winter bargains - from sensible gloves at thirty quid to boots, leathers and rainwear in every size, shape, style and budget.

All the top manufacturers had machines to die for with delivery machines sensibly placed in the mid-range. Extensive luggage, frames, panniers and boxes all the way to custom boxes for courier delivery.

IOC took time out with the MCIA to talk two-wheel compliance, theory test for commercial riding and where the new Express apprenticeship fitted into bike for the levy-funded final mile quals.

 

2019 news nov bike show worth

 

2019 news nov bike show lomas zero bike

Electric Zero Motorcycle MCN Number One for final mile electric

 

For a full exclusive tour of all things powered light vehicle take a photo tour of the NEC show below

 

 

MCIA conference on L category for commercial mobility – Electric – cargo two-wheels and more - Micromobility compliance

IOC are hon fellows of the Motorcycle Ind association, MCIA, looking to the MCIA for all things compliance on two wheels, it goes beyond motorbike to L category light vehicles, cargo cycle to electric two wheelers. IOC were at the 2019 Nov AGM.

 

Paul de Lusignan, president & chairman MCIA from Suzuki, ‘A tough year, numbers up just slightly, profitability has been a challenge.’

 2019 news nov mcia agm nec

Tony Campbell, chief exec MCIA, ‘Powered Light Vehicles - PLVs have a significant role to play in last mile delivery.’

 

Tony Campbell CEO MCIA,

The route to Tomorrow's journey, 10 new motorcycle and scooter brands joined the MCIA this year, today we cover 94% of all new registrations; we represent the sector. Two-wheel theft has been a threat to the market for far too long; it's time to get tough. We need to step up. Rider training, the rebranded 'try ride' – it's about getting new people into the market, including electric. Motorcycle live, the NEC bike show - numbers have been great so far, we have been building beyond the brands, a great day out.

 

Cars, vans, bikes and everything inbetween, we need to reduce congestion to improve air quality. Powered light vehicles, PLVs, have a significant role to play in last mile delivery. What is the industry's greatest challenge? To ensure we are an integral part of the new landscape. The whole message about climate is happening, emissions, the size of the challenge, net zero brings key change to the way we travel. Historic cities were not designed for modern transport solutions. Modern streets need to be healthy for both people and business, modal shift will have to be achieved. The market is already deciding, mono wheels and micro scooters, we need compliance. Micromobility needs compliance. Motorcycles and powered light vehicles are part of the solution to healthy modern streets.

 

Greg Archer, UK director Transport Environment,

If the two wheel sector could agree a standard for batteries and adopt battery sharing, the two wheel sector would steal a huge step on the car and van sector. Sharing product will be a big part of future mobility.

 

Digitalisation has changed our world, we used to go to Thomas Cook for holidays, we used to use Yellow Pages, transport has been slow to change. Our cars are bigger and have lots more accessories. While transport has been slow to change, change in the next ten years will be fast, 2 in every hundred cars today can be plugged in. Within two years I propose 1 in ten will be plugged in, ten per-cent. When the ten per-cent number lands the motorcycle running on petrol will look dated. Transport is changing fast, connectivity is coming quickly, cars telling us they have errors or need service, advanced cruise control and autonomous drive presents a massive opportunity for the sector. Autonomous vehicles will lead to more vehicle use, people will be happy to sit and work in their car if they don’t have to drive it. Automation needs a shift to both electric and sharing, bring the technologies together to achieve sustainable mobility.’ If the two wheel sector could agree a standard for batteries and adopt battery sharing the two wheel sector would steal a huge step on the car and van sector. Sharing product will be a big part of future mobility.

 

Andy Mayo, Local Transport Projects and independent director of the MCIA,

Creating more road space is not the solution to congestion.’ ‘How are govt and local authorities reacting to change? Climate change, reducing carbon, air quality and congestion. Congestion is the hardest challenge, more road capacity has not solved the problem, generally people travel an hour a day, in a hundred years from horse to car but the hour has remained constant. New roads, however much spent, quickly become congested. Creating more road space is not the solution to congestion. Powered light vehicles are the solution, using less fuel and taking up less road space to create health and attractive places to live. Final mile delivery is ideal for powered light vehicle solution to high density delivery. PLVS must be on the agenda of local and central government.'

 

NEC Bike Show Gallery

 

Last modified on Wednesday, 20 November 2019 12:49
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