2019 news oct ioc brexit express round table 02

 

The Institute of Couriers is big on the internet for Brexit, but it's been round the table too.

‘Get Ready for Brexit’ campaign; fellows engaged in a series of roadshows, bringing together expertise from government departments including BEIS, Home Office, HMRC, DIT, DEFRA and DCMS, combining interactive support and in-depth advice sessions to help business of all sizes get ready for Brexit. The Institute of Couriers held a dedicated Express 'Ready for Brexit' meeting in Manchester on 30th October. It also produced this dedicated web bubble for the sector, a printed pamphlet for van driver distribution and also ran extensive extracts in the Institute's 'week ahead' Sunday sector email bulletins

 

 

 


March 9th 2021 Brexit is Over?

DfT hot off the press , Manston for Dover is suspended from March 21st

DfT report this week, From Sunday 21 March, all haulier processing operations, including COVID testing for hauliers, will be suspended at Manston Airport.  If heading to the Port of Dover or Eurotunnel, you will be directed straight onto to the M20.

Free COVID testing for hauliers is still available at one of the many Information and Advice sites. Inland Border Facility checks will continue to be processed by Ashford Sevington or one of the other sites across the country.

You are strongly encouraged to get a negative COVID-19 test, to use the Check an HGV is Ready to Cross the Border service and get a valid Kent Access Permit before arriving in Kent to minimise delays.


January 18th UPS advice for shippers post-Brexit

Ufku Akaltan, president East Europe District, ‘After successfully reaching a post-Brexit trade agreement, the EU and the United Kingdom started the New Year as partners who share a common history. But the agreement does not mean "business as usual", my notes below will guide you through Brexit and help you on your journey towards a new trading landscape.

What does the Brexit deal mean for your shipments?

On 24 December 2020, the United Kingdom and the European Union reached a post-Brexit trade agreement. But the deal doesn’t mean ‘business as usual’ for shipping between the UK and the EU. Tariffs, such as import duty, will be eliminated on the trade of products shipped between the UK and the EU from 1 January 2021, depending on the origin of the goods. However, even with this deal in place, businesses and carriers will now face more paperwork and administration when shipping, meaning increased costs and adjustments to supply chains. Customs clearance will now be required for all goods moving between the UK and the EU, including for return shipments. You will need to declare the goods you are sending by completing a commercial invoice. You will also need to follow the revised VAT rules.

This page will guide you through Brexit and help you on your journey towards a new trading landscape.

 

Your Brexit-Ready Toolkit - The Basic Requirements

Start with the following basic steps to keep your goods moving as smoothly as possible.

Register for an EORI number in the UK and the EU

An Economic Operator’s Registration and Identification (EORI) number will be required to continue trading between the UK and the EU in the event of a customs border.

VAT Registration

As of 1 January, 2021, shippers selling goods valued at or below £135 into the UK will be responsible for collecting and paying UK VAT for these shipments. The VAT amount should be collected at the point of sale and paid to HMRC through the UK VAT registration.

For goods sold into the UK valued above £135, the importer will remain responsible for paying the UK VAT. This can be paid by the importer via postponed VAT accounting or through the customs declaration.

If your UK business is importing on its own name into the EU, you need to be VAT registered in the EU. We recommend you do this in the country of clearance.

Appoint an Importer of Record (IOR) if the consignee is not the declarant

The IOR is responsible and liable for your customs declarations. For UK businesses exporting to the EU this can either be an EU-based subsidiary if they are part of the transaction or an EU-based customs broker.

Moving goods to and from Northern Ireland. Northern Ireland will remain aligned to a limited set of EU rules. Goods shipped between the EU to Northern Ireland will move as an intra-Union movement. This means there will be no customs supervision, controls or formalities.

 

Origin of goods

To benefit from preferential tariffs, the products you are shipping must originate in the UK or the EU. You will need to include proof of origin of goods with the commercial invoice or other commercial documentation (excluding a bill of lading). You can self-declare the origin of goods for the first year.

 

Agri-food consignments

Agri-food consignments will require health certificates and undergo sanitary and phytosanitary controls at border inspection posts. Therefore, in order to avoid disruption at the land border, some restricted commodities can only be shipped using UPS Express services. They will still be inspected, but at other locations. It is your responsibility as the shipper to check the regulations and whether your goods will require inspection.

 


January 12th BEIS Business Readiness Bulletin 67

67


January 5th BEIS Business Readiness Bulletin 66

66

 


DfT Kent travel update, 28 December 2020

HGV traffic in Kent is moving slowly.

HGV drivers heading to the Port of Dover should get a COVID test at Manston Airport before travelling onto Dover. Eurotunnel traffic must continue to go via the M20, where testing is at Junction 8.

Where to get your COVID-test

If you are already heading to Eurotunnel, you must go to Junction 8 of the M20 and join the queue there. If you are heading to the Port of Dover, you must go to Manston Airport. To leave England you must undertake a rapid-COVID test. This is mandated by the UK and French governments. Failure to comply will lead to you being turned away from all ports.

COVID testing is not available at any medical facility in the Kent area. If you visit a medical facility you will be turned away. You must not leave your vehicle to try and be tested at another site.

At Junction 8 of the M20 and Manston Airport

COVID testing is taking place at Junction 8 of the M20 for HGV drivers heading to Eurotunnel, and at Manston for HGV drivers heading to the Port of Dover. You must be with, and remain in, your vehicle, unless requested to leave your vehicle by a member of Kent Police or medical staff. Please adhere to social distancing. Once tested, it will take 40 minutes to get a result. If your result is negative, you will be directed to your departure point. If your result is positive, further information will be provided on site and support will be available. Food and water will be provided for as long as you are waiting. We are doing everything we can as quickly as possible to help you continue on your journey.


DVSA International haulier update Dec 28th

DVSA issued 2 important updates for hauliers travelling outside the UK. (Dec 28th).

MOT exemptions

Annual test exemptions for vehicles and trailers with test exemptions travelling out of the UK. As some vehicles and trailers continue to operate under 3 or 12-month exemptions, we have published a letter which can be carried as evidence of annual test expiry date extensions. The letter shows all the new test dates by month, for 3 and 12-month exemptions. It is not a legal requirement to carry this letter, but it might help if you are stopped outside the UK.

Driver Qualification Card (DQC)

To help ensure that drivers transporting goods or passengers have up-to-date documentation, we will issue new DQCs to drivers who had previously received 7 months extended validity. More information on the previous extension. The new cards will show the extended expiry date of the Driver CPC qualification. Drivers will automatically receive their new card in the post. They must carry this card on their person at all times when driving professionally.

 


December 24th BEIS Business Readiness Bulletin 64

64

 

Business Readiness Bulletin – The UK transition

NEW UK/EU TRADE AND COOPERATION AGREEMENT ANNOUNCED

Issue 64: 24 December 2020    

The UK has left the EU, and the Brexit transition period comes to an end this year, in 8 days time. Take action now to get ready for new rules from 1 January 2021. This bulletin is issued by the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy and provides the latest information for businesses.  All information on the UK Transition can be found at www.gov.uk/transition  


Prime Minister, Boris Johnson gave a statement on the outcome of negotiations with the European Union on Thursday 24 December 2020.  

 

In his statement he announced that the United Kingdom and the European Union have agreed a Trade and Cooperation Agreement governing future trade relations from 1 January 2021, that will see no tariffs or quotas on the movement of goods produced between the UK and the EU.  An explainer document is available here.

 

More details will be published over the coming days and businesses should visit the www.GOV.UK/transition website for the latest information and to check what actions their business will need to undertake, to continue trading with the EU.

 

Highlights include:

 

Small and Medium-sized Enterprises (SMEs)

The Agreement includes commitments to provide SMEs with clear and accessible online information about the Agreement, helping them to trade and do business in the UK and the EU. This covers customs procedures, intellectual property rights, and public procurement. The Agreement commits the UK and the EU to provide for a searchable online database, on measures such as customs duties, taxes and rules of origin.

 

Moving Goods

The United Kingdom and the European Union have agreed 100% tariff liberalisation. This means that there will be no tariffs or quotas on the movement of goods between the UK and the EU, where goods meet the relevant Rules of Origin.

 

Business Services

The Agreement includes provisions to support trade in services (including financial services and legal services). This will provide many UK service suppliers with legal guarantees that they will not face barriers to trade when selling into the EU and will support the mobility of UK professionals who will continue to do business across the EU.

 

In line with common FTA practice, the Technical Barriers to Trade Chapter also includes a number of sector-specific Annexes which seek to promote cooperation and tackle barriers to trade in the automotive, chemical, pharmaceutical, organic products and wine sectors

 

Medicine

The Annex on medicinal products provides for mutual recognition of Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) inspections and certificates, meaning that manufacturing facilities do not need to undergo separate UK and EU inspections, as well as ongoing co-operation.

 

Motor Vehicles

The Annex confirms that both the UK and the EU will mutually recognise approvals based on UN regulations. It establishes dedicated cooperation mechanisms to address regulatory barriers and provides for information exchange to support activities including market surveillance.

 

Chemicals

The Annex seeks to facilitate trade in chemicals, ensure high levels of environmental and health protection and provides for cooperation between authorities. It includes joint commitments to comprehensive implementation of international classification and labelling rules as well as commitments to ongoing cooperation and information exchange.

 

Food and Drink

The Annex will provide for an equivalence agreement between organic products in the UK and the EU. This means products that are certified as organic in one market will be recognised as organic in the other.

The Annex provides for simplified certification, documentation, labelling and packaging requirements for the imports of wine produced in the UK or the EU, reducing costs for exporters and consumers. It also sets out requirements to share information and to jointly review the agreement in future with a view to further facilitating trade in wine.

 

Travel between the UK and EU

The Agreement also includes arrangements for airlines and hauliers that provides them with certainty and gives people the ability to travel to and from the EU easily. It also includes a social security agreement that has practical benefits for UK citizens including accessing healthcare when travelling in the EU.

 

Mutual Recognition of Professional Qualifications

The Agreement clarifies that the provisions on professional qualifications are without prejudice to alternative arrangements that the UK may agree with the EU, allowing for improved mechanisms to be agreed in future. Agreements will be negotiated on a profession-by-profession basis.

 

Digital Trade

These provisions will promote trade in digital services and facilitate new forms of trade in goods and services. The provision helps to facilitate the cross-border flow of data by prohibiting requirements to store or process data in a certain location. This prevents the imposition of costly requirements for British businesses.

 


December 21th BEIS Business Readiness Bulletin 63

63

 

 


December 16th BEIS Business Readiness Bulletin 62

 

62

 

 

 


December 11th BEIS Business Readiness Bulletin 61

 

61

 

 

 


December 7th BEIS Business Readiness Bulletin 60

 

60

 

 

 


December 15th DfT

 

'Check an HGV is Ready to Cross the Border' service is available now.

Hauliers and commercial drivers are now able to log on to the ‘Check a HGV is Ready to Cross the Border’ service to register their details and prepare for any upcoming journeys they may have in the New Year.

The new service is designed to make it quick and easy for you to check that you have the right customs documentation for the goods you’re carrying before setting off – preventing any unnecessary journeys and reducing disruption at the border

It is the responsibility of the driver to do the check, but this can be done on their behalf by their manager.

From 1 January 2021, drivers travelling to the Port of Dover or Eurotunnel will be required to use the Check an HGV is Ready to Cross the Border service and get a Kent Access Permit (KAP). A KAP will be required regardless of agreement of the outcome of the negotiations. You can be fined £300 if you do not use the service when travelling through Kent or if you provide a fraudulent declaration.

Drivers of HGVs lighter than 7.5 tonnes or those leaving from a port other than Dover or Eurotunnel do NOT need a Kent Access Permit (KAP) but should still use the checker to ensure compliance at their border crossing.

 
 
 

December 2nd DfT

 

Current measures to manage traffic flow on Kent’s road network in the event of severe disruption to services across the English Channel

Operation Brock is a traffic management system designed to keep Kent’s roads open in the event of disruption at the Port of Dover and Eurotunnel.

When Operation Brock is in force, HGVs travelling to Port of Dover and Eurotunnel must use the signed routes only.

Enforcement officials will be deployed to intercept vehicles trying to use alternative routes. Drivers who are caught will be turned around and risk a £300 fine.

 

Kent Police take decisions on when to use the different phases of the system, depending on the scale of any disruption. Options include:

-A20 Dover TAP - A queuing system which holds lorries until space becomes available at the port.

-M20 moveable barrier - A concrete barrier than can be deployed quickly between junctions 8 and 9 of the M20 to install a contraflow. HGVs bound for Dover and/or Eurotunnel will be held on the coastbound carriageway.

-Manston Airfield - An off-road site designed to hold traffic heading for the Port of Dover. Border readiness checks will take place here to ensure hauliers have the correct paperwork.

-Ashford Sevington Inland Border Facility - An off-road site next to junction 10A of the M20, likely to be used if the M20 contraflow approaches capacity. Signs, diversions, and speed restrictions will be in place to help drivers reach the designated holding areas. Failure to comply with instructions may result in fines and delays.

 

Driver welfare

Drivers who plan to travel through Kent in early 2021 should be aware that there is potential for disruption in the event of delays at the border.

Plan your journey to ensure you take breaks and rest periods before entering Kent to minimise the risk of hitting drivers’ hours limits. Make sure you have enough food and water. Welfare will be available for drivers stuck in stationary queues for extended periods of time.

 

Check an HGV is Ready to Cross the Border service

Hauliers travelling to the Port of Dover or Eurotunnel need to use the Check an HGV service to get a Kent Access Permit and check they have the right EU import and commodities documents for the goods they are carrying.

All HGVs that are travelling to the EU via the Short Straits will need to have a valid Kent Access Permit (KAP), whether they are carrying goods or not.

If an HGV is empty or carrying post, the driver should still declare this on the Check an HGV service and obtain a valid KAP.

You can be fined £300 if you do not use the service when you travel via the Port of Dover or Eurotunnel, or if you provide a fraudulent declaration.

The service will be available via GOV.UK from the week commencing 14 December 2020. Hauliers making local journeys, or travelling within Kent, will not require a Kent Access Permit.

 

 


November 2020

 BEIS resumed its Business Readiness Bulletins at the end of October 2020. These are reproduced for fellows' convenience.


November 30th BEIS Business Readiness Bulletin 59

59

 

 


November 23rd BEIS Business Readiness Bulletin 58

58

 

 


November 16th BEIS Business Readiness Bulletin 57

57

 

 


November 9th BEIS Business Readiness Bulletin 56

56

 

 


November 4th BEIS Business Readiness Bulletin 55

55

 

 


October 29th BEIS Business Readiness Bulletin 54

54

 

 

 

 

 


National Audit Office report Nov 6th

The UK border: preparedness for the end of the transition period

(Fri Nov 6th) the National Audit Office (NAO) reports that although government departments have made progress in recent months implementing the changes required to systems, infrastructure and resources to manage the border at the end of the post-EU Exit transition period, it is still likely that widespread disruption will occur from 1 January 2021.

 The NAO says that government must continue to focus its efforts on resolving the many outstanding issues relating to the border and develop robust contingency plans if these cannot be addressed in time for the end of the transition period.

In its fourth report assessing government’s preparations at the border, the NAO highlights that planning for 1 January 20212 has built on work done for previous EU Exit deadlines, but COVID-19 has exacerbated delays in government’s preparations and significant risks remain, particularly in relation to implementing the Northern Ireland Protocol3 and trader readiness more generally.

Click here to read the fourth NAO report

Departments have made progress towards implementing the systems, infrastructure and resources required to operate the border in relation to Great Britain at “minimum operating capability” by 1 January 2021 and are reasonably confident most will be ready, but timetables are tight. The ability for traders to move goods under transit arrangements is a key element of the government’s plans but some elements will be challenging to deliver in their entirety. HMRC currently estimates that there will be around 6.3 million movements of goods under transit arrangements in the year following the end of the transition period. If all the planned arrangements are not ready, this could have an impact on the ease with which traders can import and export goods.

There is little time for ports and other third parties to integrate their systems and processes with new or changed government systems, and contingency plans may need to be invoked for some elements. In part as a result of the delays caused by COVID-19, there is limited time to test individual elements and resolve any emerging issues; ensure elements operate together; familiarise users with them in advance and little or no contingency time in the event of any delays.

Even if government makes further progress with its preparations, there is still likely to be significant disruption at the border from 1 January 2021 as traders will be unprepared for new EU border controls which will require additional administration and checks. The government’s latest reasonable worst-case planning assumptions, from September 2020, are that 40% to 70% per cent of hauliers will not be ready for these new controls and up to 7,000 lorries may need to queue at the approach to the short Channel crossings,6 such as Dover to Calais.

The government’s plan for reducing the risk of disruption at the approach to the short Channel crossings is still developing, with various issues yet to be resolved. It intends to launch a new GOV.UK web service called ‘Check an HGV is ready to cross the border’ for hauliers to check and self-declare that they have the correct documentation for EU import controls before travelling and obtain permits to drive on prescribed roads in Kent. However, there is more to do on how ‘Check an HGV’ will be enforced and how it will work together with traffic management plans for Kent.

Government is preparing civil contingency plans, such as to ensure continuity of the supply of critical goods and medicines in the event of disruption to supply chains. On 13 October 2020 the Department for Transport announced it had awarded contracts to provide additional freight capacity for over 3,000 lorries a week on routes avoiding the short Channel crossings. However, COVID-19 is making civil contingency plans more difficult to enact, with local authorities, industry and supply chains already under additional strain.

Government will also need to implement the Northern Ireland Protocol from 1 January 2021. However, due to the scale and complexity of the changes, the lack of time and the impact of ongoing negotiations, there is a very high risk it may not be implemented in time. The government has left itself little time to mobilise its new Trader Support Service (TSS), in which it has announced it is investing £200 million, to reduce the burden on traders moving goods to Northern Ireland and to help them prepare. It will be challenging to establish the TSS by 1 January 2021. Work needs to be done to identify NI traders and sign them up to use the service; recruit and train the staff required; develop software to enable traders to connect to HMRC’s systems; and deliver educational activities to traders. There is also ongoing uncertainty about the requirements for the movement of goods under the Protocol. Therefore, there is still a high risk that traders will not be ready.

The government is spending significant sums of money preparing the border for the end of the transition period and, in 2020 alone, announced funding of £1.41 billion to fund new infrastructure and systems, and wider support and investment. Despite this, there remains significant uncertainty about whether preparations will be complete in time, and the impact if they are not. Some of this uncertainty could have been avoided, and better preparations made, had the government addressed sooner issues such as the need for an increase in the number of customs agents to support traders.

The NAO says that government must continue to focus its efforts on resolving the many outstanding issues relating to the border and develop robust contingency plans if these cannot be addressed in time for the end of the transition period.


October 2020

We take a quick review of latest DfT, BEIS & DEFRA detail to explain what goods-vehicle operators need to do to carry out international road haulage from 1 January 2021.

Carry the right operator licence

From 1 January 2021, the operator licensing requirements for journeys to, through or from the EU, Iceland, Liechtenstein and Norway will change. The Community Licence will be phased out and replaced with a UK Licence for the Community. The new licence and certified copies will be issued automatically and must be carried when driving abroad. You will still need a  standard international operator licence.

Get the right permits

From 1 January 2021, you may need an ECMT or other additional permits for journeys to or through the EU. You should apply for these in case they’re needed. You can apply for ECMT permits for 2021 between 2 November and 20 November 2020.

Register your vehicle trailers

You must register these types of trailers before you drive to or through most EU countries, Iceland, Liechtenstein and Norway:

· commercial trailers weighing over 750kg

· non-commercial trailers weighing over 3,500kg

Abnormal load trailers

You now need a keeper’s certificate for an abnormal load trailer to use it abroad. Keep the certificate in the vehicle to show at border crossings. Some countries measure abnormal loads differently from the UK. Check with each country you’re travelling through to find out if the load you’re transporting counts as abnormal there.

Vehicle registration documents

Your drivers will need to carry your vehicle registration documents when driving abroad for less than 12 months. This can be either:

· the vehicle log book (V5C), if you have one

· a VE103 to show you’re allowed to use a hired or leased vehicle abroad

Check an HGV is ready to cross the border

You’ll be able to use the ‘check an HGV is ready to cross the border’ service to prove that an HGV has the right EU import and commodities documents for the goods it’s carrying before it crosses the GB / EU border. You must use this service for HGVs travelling via the Port of Dover or Eurotunnel to get a ‘Kent Access Permit’ before they enter Kent. The link provided above is to a demonstration page only (26 Oct 2020). This page will redirect to the live UK.GOV service in December 2020.

You can be fined £300 if you do not use the service when you travel via the Port of Dover or Eurotunnel, or if you provide a fraudulent declaration.

Display GB stickers

Display a Great Britain (GB) sticker on the rear of the vehicle and trailer, even if the vehicle has a number plate with the Euro symbol or a GB national identifier.You do not need to display a GB sticker to drive in Ireland.

Vehicle and trailer insurance

A ‘green card’ is proof of motor insurance cover when driving abroad. Your drivers should plan to carry one for the vehicle they’re driving in the EU and EEA from 1 January 2021. Your drivers will need to carry multiple green cards if:

· you have fleet insurance - you’ll need a green card for each vehicle

· their vehicle is towing a trailer - they will need one for the towing vehicle and one for the trailer (separate trailer insurance is needed in some countries)

· there are 2 policies covering the duration of the trip, for example, if the policy renews during the journey

Contact your vehicle insurance provider at least 6 weeks before you need green cards.

What to do if your vehicle is involved in a road accident

If your drivers are involved in a road accident in an EU country they should in the first instance contact their insurer.

From 1 January 2021, any legal proceedings against either the responsible driver or the insurer of the vehicle will need to be brought in the EU or EEA country where the accident happened. You might have to make your claim in the local language. You may not get compensation in some countries if the accident is caused by an uninsured driver or if the driver cannot be traced.


 

 

 

Taking a look back

Oct 30th Manchester Brexit round table for express logistics, final mile, last mile. At the Crowne Plaza Manchester M15 6PQ for the IOC Middle England Brexit last mile masterclass.

Election date announced for Dec 12th 2019 – Brexit on hold. Logistics heartland Middle England for the IOC Last Mile Manchester masterclass on all things BREXIT brought explanation.

It was a must-attend in the Express hot-spot of Middle England on Oct 30 for a free-to-attend round table with the experts speaking to clarify where we are on borders, licence compliance, reality of dates and more.

 

IOC launch dedicated BREXIT Express final mile guide booklet

 

brexit manchester event oct 2019

Photo of Booklet launch, IOC chair Carl Lomas with expert keynote Alan Lewis and IOC CEO Tracey Worth.

 

Keynote by Alan Lewis, former Irwin Mitchell expert lawyer, now with Constantine Law

Check strategy of supplier contracts that cross what you believe will be the new Brexit date.

Brexit date for future, for express its going to be about risk vision.

Alan Lewis , ‘Has your Express company been involved in a Brexit risk assessment or set your own risk assessment to review your future with or without Europe?

What does it all mean and when will it happen?

1. Will there be a transition period? If the UK and the EU conclude a withdrawal agreement before the UK leaves the EY, yes until 31/12/2020

2. During the transition period, most EU law will still apply to the UK

3. At the end of the transition period the withdrawal agreement aims to avoid short term disruption by clarifying what will happen when EU rules stop applying to the UK

4. Also at the end of the transition period, the main provisions of the Protocol on Northern Ireland (NI) to the withdrawal agreement would come into effect. That requires NI to remain aligned to specified EU single market and customs rules need to avoid a hard border in Ireland.

5. If no withdrawal agreement is concluded by exit day (now extended to 31 January 2020) and if there is no further extension of the Article 50 period, and the Article 50 notice is not revoked, the UK will still leave under Article 50 but with no deal. This means there will be no transition period.

 

Alan continued,

With express final mile in the focus, a lack of skills because of cross boarder population move will increase. Supplier insolvency may be an issue as will exchange rate variations. Pipeline of goods may cause delivery failure. Be sure to check contract dates that may cross the Brexit date from Dec to April 2020. Issues will arise where Brexit date crosses a contract date, you may even keep a contract with extensions because of Brexit.

 

Keynote by Tracey Worth CEO Institute of Couriers

Brexit impact on client chain for final mile express delivery.

Client chain drivers in express final mile, last mile, express courier, the impact of BREXIT on that client chain for the express business model

 

Business model of express impact by Brexit,
Distribution compliance of road and storage of goods,
Border impact on chain of goods - the client chain model
Compliance of driver licence,
DCPC non-impact via euro regs for the heavier vehicles

 

Tracey added,

DCPC regs on the heavier vehicles will not change across the Brexit regulations. Client chain impact to final mile, home delivery of goods crossing EU borders will be impacted, and the business models you operate will need to adopt to possible change.

 

 

Keynote by Grant Mitchell

Brexit impact on finance for express delivery.

Outline for Finance during Brexit for the express final mile, last mile sector.

New customs and VAT procedures
Possible continuation of European funding
Changes to import / export regulations
Possible delays and impact on cashflow
Additional costs and business funding requirements

Grant added, ‘the key focus for the uncertain times ahead is cash flow impact for express delivery companies in the Brexit period.’

 

IOC Chairman Carl Lomas chaired

Carl Lomas acted as meeting chair, delivered speaker intros, showcased booklet introduction for ‘Express and final mile drivers’.

Lomas keynote

‘Exploding express numbers and Brexit impact via borders air and water.’
Pineapple used as an example of food final mile.
Pineapple forms express delivery case study but let's talk oranges from Spain
Food product, cross-border.
Multi-modal, multi-border, perishable item on express timescale to retail.
Final mile, express delivery to door.
Refocusing perishable items on European border.
Expanding on Tracey Worth speaking clarity of client chain impact re Brexit borders.

 

The keynote concluded with showcase of the recent Sunday email briefings from Operation Brock around the Kent ports to the one-stop sector knowledge web bubble on the Institute of Couriers website.

 

The IOC BREXIT Bubble (this page) evolves as the go-to for final mile


DfT Guidance this week (published Jan 25th 2020)

What UK drivers need to do to drive while visiting the EU from 1 January 2021

 

Driving licences and international driving permits

You will still need to carry your UK driving licence with you.

You may also need an international driving permit (IDP) to drive in some EU and EEA countries from 1 January 2021.

The type of IDP that you may need will depend on the countries you will drive through. Further detail on this will be available later in 2020.

You will not need an IDP to drive when visiting Ireland if you have a UK driving licence.

You can get an IDP over the counter at the post office. An IDP costs £5.50 and drivers must:

·         be a Great Britain or Northern Ireland resident

·         have a full UK driving licence

·         be 18 or over

 

Insurance for your vehicle

A ‘green card’ is proof that you have motor insurance cover when driving abroad. You should plan to carry one for the vehicle your driving in
the EU and EEA from 1 January 2021. You will need to carry multiple green cards if:

·         you have fleet insurance – you’ll need a green card for each vehicle

·         your
vehicle is towing a trailer or caravan - you’ll need one for the towing
vehicle and one for the trailer / caravan (you need separate trailer
insurance in some countries)

·         you have 2 policies covering the duration of your trip, for example, if your policy renews during the journey

 

Contact your vehicle insurance provider 1 month before you travel to get green cards for your vehicle.

 

Vehicle registration documents

If you’re taking your vehicle to the EU for less than 12 months, you should carry one of the following documents with you:

·         your vehicle log book (V5C), if you have one

·         VE103 to show you’re allowed to use your hired or leased vehicle abroad

 

Trailer registration

You will still need to register some commercial and non-commercial trailers before towing them to or through most EU and EEA countries.

 

GB stickers and number plates

Display a Great Britain (GB) sticker on the rear of the vehicle and trailer, even if the vehicle has a number plate with the Euro symbol or
a GB national identifier.

You do not need to display a GB sticker to drive in Ireland.

 

What to do if you’re involved in a road accident

If you’re involved in a road accident in an EU country you should in the first instance contact your insurer. From 1 January 2021, any legal
proceedings against either the responsible driver or the insurer of the vehicle will need to be brought in the EU or EEA country where the
accident happened. You might have to make your claim in the local language. You will not get compensation in some countries if the
accident is caused by an uninsured driver or if the driver cannot be traced.

 


The 16 March 2020 Issue 45 was the last Brexit Business Readiness Bulletin produced by BEIS. From that point onward they switched to sending COVID bulletins to the Brexit subscriber list (up to Oct 26 2020). These bulletins contain no BREXIT transition period-related advice and so are not included here.


Business Readiness Bulletin

Issue 45: 16 March 2020   

Introduction     

Welcome to the latest in a series of business readiness bulletins, aimed at keeping trade associations, business representative bodies and business intermediaries up to date on the latest guidance for business, whilst the UK is in a transition period, which will last until the end of the year. This Bulletin aims to provide you and your networks/members with important information from Government, to help prepare for the end of the transition period.    

Bulletin Updates

 

Subscribers to this bulletin will now also receive our new Business Readiness Coronavirus (COVID-19) bulletin, providing important information for your members and networks. The email subject heading will make clear whether the bulletin is focused on COVID-19 or  transition period information. If you have any questions on this, please contact us at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

Please note that all future bulletins will come from this email address. You will not be able to reply to this address. However, you can always contact us at the usual address, and this will be clearly stated in the footer of every bulletin. You will continue to be subscribed but the management of your subscription preferences will be easier for you to control. Contact us on the above address if you have any further questions.

Future Relationship with the EU

 

NEW – The first round of negotiations between the EU and UK began on 2 March. Given the latest COVID-19 developments, EU and UK negotiators have jointly decided not to hold face-to-face negotiations in London.  Both sides are currently exploring alternative ways to continue discussions, including, if possible, the use of video conferences.

It is the government’s aim to secure a comprehensive free trade agreement as well as agreement on questions such as fisheries, internal security and aviation. Full details on the future relationship the UK’s approach to negotiations has been published here.  

The UK's approach to trade negotiations with the US

NEW – A new policy paper has been published setting out the UK’s objectives in trade negotiations with United States of America here.

     

Business Readiness Forum       

Please see the attached PDF of the slides from our Business Readiness Webinar from 5 March 2020. The topics covered include the new migration policy changes, the freeport consultation and coronavirus. The slides from the 20 February 2020 forum have also been included as not everyone received them. Further details about our next Forum will be sent to relevant organisations under a separate cover once one is confirmed. Please share your thoughts, feedback or topics you would find useful with us via This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Business Support Website

NEW - The government has recently launched a Business Support campaign bringing together in one place a range of government business support and advice. For more information, visit www.businesssupport.gov.uk.

 

Digital tool for exporters of goods from the UK

The Department for International Trade has launched ‘Check How to Export Goods’, a new digital tool to help UK businesses trade with over 160 markets around the world. The free tool will help you easily find and understand what is needed to export goods internationally. It provides product-specific and country-specific information on tariffs, regulations, the UK border and other topics all in one place. It will be updated regularly to reflect any changes to trading arrangements.

Freeports Consultation

The UK Government has launched a public consultation on Freeports policy. It is proposed that up to 10 Freeports will be introduced across the UK, which will be national hubs for trade, innovation and commerce. The Government’s aim is for Freeports to attract new businesses, jobs, investment and opportunity.

You can find more information and respond to the consultation by 20 April 2020 here.

Actions you can take now that do not depend on negotiations

Following its departure from the EU on 31 January 2020 the UK is now in a transition period until the end of 2020, while the UK negotiates a free trade agreement. This link provides a list of actions of what you can do now, all transition period information and the opportunity for you to sign up to email alerts about the transition period.

Recent Announcements

NEW – The Department for International Trade have published details of which trade agreements the UK is negotiating and which trade agreements the UK has already signed can be found here - The UK’s trade agreements.

NEW – On Wednesday 11 March, the Chancellor delivered the Budget. The key messages announced can be found on Budget 2020: What you need to know

 

Business Intelligence and Readiness Directorate      

Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy

 


Business Readiness Bulletin      

Issue 44: 24 February 2020   

Introduction     

Welcome to the latest in a series of business readiness bulletins, aimed at keeping trade associations, business representative bodies and business intermediaries up to date on the latest guidance for business whilst the UK is in a transition period which will last until the end of the year. This Bulletin aims to provide you and your networks/members with important information from Government, to help prepare for the end of the transition period.    

 

 

Recent Announcements

 

NEW – The Home Office has published a policy statement which sets out the government’s plans for a new UK points-based immigration system. The UK's points-based immigration system: policy statement. They have also produced a New immigration system: what you need to know.

 

UPDATE – The Home Office has updated information for employers on employing EU, EEA and Swiss citizens in the UK, covering right to work checks, the EU Settlement Scheme and the UK’s new immigration system. Employing EU citizens in the UK

 

NEW – The Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy’s Secretary of State, Alok Sharma, has written an article outlining the benefits of the new points-based immigration system for businesses. Our message to the world: Britain is open for business

 

 

 

     

Business Readiness Forum       

Thank you to those that joined the Forum last week.  Please see the attached PDF of the slides from our Business Readiness Forum from 20 February 2020. Our next forum will be a webinar on Thursday 5 March 2020. Further details will be sent to relevant organisations under a separate cover. Please share your thoughts, feedback or topics you would find useful with us via This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

 

 

Questions

UK Global Tariff Consultation

The UK left the European Union on 31 January 2020.

For the first time in almost fifty years the UK is free to set its tariff rates on imported goods. To inform the development of the new UK Global Tariff, the Government has launched a four-week public consultation and is seeking your views. The consultation began on 6 February 2020 and closes on 5 March 2020 at 23:59 GMT.

This consultation seeks:

•views on a potential series of amendments to the EU’s Common External Tariff to create a bespoke UK tariff regime;

•specific feedback on individual products or commodity codes of importance to you (including the corresponding tariff rate); and

•information on your interactions with Most Favoured Nation tariffs and the importance of tariffs to sectors that are relevant to you.

The bespoke UK tariff regime will enter into force on 1 January 2021 and replace the EU’s Common External Tariff.

To take part in the consultation and have your say on the new UK Global Tariff, visit GOV.UK.

 

Digital tool for exporters of goods from the UK

The Department for International Trade has launched ‘Check How to Export Goods’, a new digital tool to help UK businesses trade with over 160 markets around the world. The free tool will help you easily find and understand what is needed to export goods internationally. It provides product-specific and country-specific information on tariffs, regulations, the UK border and other topics all in one place. It will be updated regularly to reflect any changes to trading arrangements.

 

Signpost

Freeports Consultation

The UK Government has launched a public consultation on Freeports policy. It will last for ten weeks.

It is proposed that up to 10 Freeports will be introduced across the UK, which will be national hubs for trade, innovation and commerce. The Government’s aim is for Freeports to attract new businesses, jobs, investment and opportunity.

You can find more information and respond to the consultation by 20 April 2020 here.

 

 

 

Actions you can take now that do not depend on negotiations

 

Following its departure from the EU on 31 January 2020 the UK is now in a transition period until the end of 2020, while the UK negotiates a free trade agreement. This link provides a list of actions business can undertake now, all transition period information and the opportunity for you to sign up to email alerts about the transition period.

 

 

Business Intelligence and Readiness Directorate      

Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy    

 


Business Readiness Bulletin      

Issue 43: 11 February 2020   

Introduction     

Welcome to the latest in a series of business readiness bulletins, aimed at keeping trade associations, business representative bodies and business intermediaries up to date on the latest guidance for business whilst the UK is in a transition period which will last until the end of the year. This Bulletin aims to provide you and your networks/members with important information from Government, to help prepare for the end of the transition period.    

 


Controls at the Border

 

NEW - Yesterday, the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster delivered a speech where he confirmed the Government’s plans to introduce full import controls for goods moving  into and out of the EU to Great Britain after the transition period ends on 31 December 2020. 

 

This means that all goods entering the UK from the EU will be subject to the same checks and controls as goods coming from the rest of the world and that there will be new processes that UK exporters and importers of EU goods will have to comply with, whether we reach a new trade agreement or not.

 

Businesses will need to prepare for life outside the EU and many have already done so. For example, from 1 January 2021 businesses will need to make customs declarations to move goods into and out of the EU. Businesses can prepare for border controls by making sure they have an EORI number if they don’t already have one and also look into how they want to make declarations such as using a customs agent.

 

It was also announced yesterday that HMRC have extended the deadline for businesses to apply for customs support funding to 31 January 2021. There is still at least £7.5 million available so that more businesses can hire or train experts to deal with customs declarations. Details can be found here.


Freeports Consultation

NEW - Yesterday a public consultation on Freeports policy was launched. It will last for ten weeks.

It is proposed that up to 10 Freeports will be introduced across the UK, which will be national hubs for trade, innovation and commerce. The Government’s aim is for Freeports to attract new businesses, jobs, investment and opportunity.

You can find more information and respond to the consultation by 20 April 2020 here.

 


UK Global Tariff Consultation

NEW - The UK Government has launched a consultation on the UK’s independent tariff policy to apply from 1 January 2021.

In setting the tariff rates, the Government will uphold the principles set out in the Taxation (Cross-border Trade) Act 2018, and seeks to balance strategic trade objectives, such as the delivery of the UK’s FTA trade agenda, and to maintain the Government’s commitment to developing countries to reduce poverty through trade.

The consultation offers respondents the opportunity to provide:

·         views on changes to the Common External Tariff to create a bespoke UK tariff regime;

·         specific feedback on individual products or commodity codes of importance to them, including on the corresponding tariff rate; and

·         information on their interactions with MFN tariffs and the importance of tariffs to their sectors.

The consultation will close on 5 March 2020 and an announcement on the UK’s new Global Tariff schedule will follow shortly afterwards.  The consultation can be found here.


Business Readiness Forum       

Please see the attached PDF of the slides from our Business Readiness Webinar from 6 February 2020. Our next forum will be a webinar on Thursday 20 February 2020. Further details will be sent to relevant organisations under a separate cover. Please share your thoughts, feedback or topics you would find useful with us via This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..  The forum will continue throughout the transition period although the frequency is under review.


New Online Tool ‘Check How to Export Goods’

 

NEW - The Department for International Trade has launched a digital tool to give businesses the information they need to export goods out of the UK market. The free tool, called ‘Check How to Export Goods’, has launched on GOV.UK.

 

The tool helps any business, particularly SMEs, to trade with over 160 markets by providing up to date information and guidance on what they need to know and do in order to export goods to an EU country or to the rest of the world.  

 

Businesses input their product commodity code and export destination and can then access product-level and country specific information including duties, regulations, customs procedures and trade agreements between the UK and other markets.  

 

The tool saves time by providing the information that is needed to trade goods in one place.

 

‘Check How to Export Goods’ includes key information on: 

 

·         Commodity codes  

·         Duties, taxes, charges and quotas  

·         Rules of origin 

·         How to move your goods out of the UK 

·         How to move your goods into other countries/destinations  

 

The service is free to use and is available here.

Click here for more information and advice on exporting.


Actions you can take now that do not depend on negotiations

 

Following its departure from the EU on 31 January 2020 the UK is now in a transition period until the end of 2020, while the UK negotiates a free trade agreement. This link provides a list of actions of what you can do now, all transition period information and the opportunity for you to sign up to email alerts about the transition period.

 

Recent Announcements

 

NEW - The Department for International Trade and Export Joint Control Unit have published a notice of the current export licensing arrangements which will continue to apply until the end of the transition period on 31 December 2020. Notice to exporters 2020/03: exporting and trading items subject to strategic controls during the transition period.

Companies House has produced guidance to help you find out whether your business will need to change its company registration from 1 January 2021, and how to do this.Changing your company registration from 1 January 2021.

Business Intelligence and Readiness Directorate

Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy 

E: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 


 

BEIS have issued a new Business Readiness Bulletin which contains the latest information about the 11-month transition period which began on Feb 01 2020.


Welcome to the latest in a series of business readiness bulletins, aimed at keeping trade associations, business representative bodies and business intermediaries up to date on the latest guidance for business whilst the UK is in an 11-month transition period. This Bulletin aims to provide you and your networks with important information from Government, to help your members and networks prepare for when we exit the transition period.

 

Written Ministerial Statement on UK negotiations with the European Union

The Prime Minister has today, Monday 3 February 2020, laid a statement in the House of Commons that sets out the Government’s proposed approach to the negotiations with the EU about our future relationship. Further details on this and other trade negotiations will be made available, as the process develops.

 

Actions you can take now that do not depend on negotiations

After 31 January 2020 there will be a transition period until the end of 2020, while the UK and EU negotiate a Canada-style free trade agreement. This link provides a list of actions of what you can do now, all transition period information and the opportunity for you to sign up to email alerts about the transition period.

 

Recent Announcements

NEW – The Competition and Markets Authority has published guidance on its functions under the Withdrawal Agreement. The guidance is intended for businesses and their legal advisors but may also be of interest to other enforcers. UK Exit from the EU: Guidance on the functions of the CMA under the Withdrawal Agreement.

NEW – The UK is introducing a points-based immigration system from 2021. The Home Office has created this page which will be updated with the latest information about the new-points based immigration system. You can also sign up for email alerts. New immigration system: what you need to know.

NEW – The Department for International Trade have published guidance to help you find out which trade agreements with non-EU countries are in place during and after the transition period. UK trade agreements with non-EU countries.

NEW – The Intellectual Property Office has produced information on trademarks, designs, patents, copyright, and exhaustion of IP rights during the transition period. Intellectual property and the transition period.

NEW – The Department for Exiting the European Union produced guidance on International Agreements with third countries during the transition period. International Agreements with Third Countries during the Transition Period.

NEW – The Intellectual Property Office has produced guidance for businesses and organisations holding EU trademarks at the end of the transition period. EU trademark protection and comparable UK trademarks.

NEW – The Intellectual Property Office has produced guidance for business holding registered community designs and international trademarks and designs after the end of the transition period. Changes to EU and international designs and trade mark protection from 1 January 2021.

NEW – The Intellectual Property Office has produced guidance for businesses who have unregistered community designs. Changes to unregistered designs from 1 January 2021

NEW– The Ministry of Justice has produced guidance for legal services business owners on preparing the end of the transition period.  Legal services business owners from 1 January 2021

NEW – The Intellectual Property Office has produced guidance on how protection in the EU for databases produced in the UK will change after the end of the transition period. Sui generis database rights from 1 January 2021.

NEW – The Intellectual Property Office has produced guidance covering the impacts on UK right holders, businesses, cultural heritage institutions and consumers. It is not legal advice. Changes to copyright law from1 January 2021.

NEW– The Intellectual Property Office has produced guidance on actions that parallel exporters to the EEA and intellectual property rights holders will need to take after the transition period. Exhaustion of IP rights and parallel trade from 1 January 2021.

NEW – The Intellectual Property Office has produced guidance on international trademark registrations protected in the EU under the Madrid Protocol will no longer enjoy protection in the UK after the transition period. Changes to international trade mark registrations from 1 January 2021.

NEW – Companies House has produced guidance to help you find out whether your business will need to change its company registration from 1 January 2021, and how to do this. Changing your company registration from 1 January 2021.

Business Intelligence and Engagement Directorate

Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy


 

DfT December posting: Contact the Brexit imports and exports helpline 0300 3301 331

Get information about importing and exporting goods after Brexit. Call the helpline to find out about: Customs declarations and procedures. Duties and tariffs. Importing and exporting different goods and transporting goods to and from the EU. Product safety regulations. Imports and exports: Brexit enquiries Telephone: 0300 3301 331. Monday to Friday, 8am to 6pm

 

Steps for Business to get ready for Brexit

The UK will be leaving the EU on 31st January 2020. This will bring important changes to doing business. Here are the top things your business can now do to get ready.

1. Make sure your employees’ professional qualifications are recognised in the UK, EEA and Switzerland.

Make sure your employees’ professional qualifications, such as driving licences, are recognised in country where they are doing business. EEA or Swiss qualified professionals will need their qualifications recognised by the relevant UK regulator. UK professionals working in the EEA or Switzerland will need their qualifications recognised by the relevant regulator in the country they want to work in.

Search ‘providing services to the EU’ on www.gov.uk/Brexit for more information.

2. Prepare for new customs and VAT procedures at the border when trading with the EU.

To continue importing from and exporting to the EU from the leave date there are changes you need to make now. Make sure you have an Economic Operators Registration and Identification (EORI) number that starts with GB. It’s quick, easy and free to do on gov.uk/Brexit. For businesses that import there is also the option of applying to make this easier with transitional simplifies procedures (TSP). This streamlines the process and is ideal for those new to customs procedures.

Find step by step guides to importing and exporting, as well as more information, at www.gov.uk/Brexit-traders.

3. Check requirements to operate in EU member states.

Check the regulations for EU/EEA countries to ensure you can still operate there, as UK businesses and service providers may face additional legal, regulatory and administrative barriers.

Search ‘providing services to the EU’ on www.gov.uk/brexit for more information.

4. Signpost the EU Settlement Scheme

Employers can help their EU, EEA, and Swiss staff get the information they need to apply for status under the EU Settlement Scheme. This will enable them to secure their rights in the UK. Applicants have until at least the 31 December 2020 to make an application.

Search ‘EU Settlement Scheme Employer Toolkit’ on www.gov.uk/brexit for more information.

5.Act now to continue legally receiving personal data from the EU/EAA after Brexit.

Check how you can legally continue to receive personal data such as names, addresses or payroll details from organisations in the EU or EEA after the leave date. You may need to update your contracts or take other steps. An example of a personal data transfer from an EU/EEA partner is a UK company that receives customer information from an EU/EEA company to provide goods or services.

Find additional information at www.gov.uk/brexit-personal-data or visit the information Commissioners Office (ICO) guidance at www.ico.org.uk and search for ‘data protection and Brexit.

6.Check whether any EU funding you receive will be guaranteed.

The government has guaranteed that UK organisations will continue to receive funding over their projects’ lifetimes if they have successfully bid into EU-funded programmes up to the end of 2020. Payments can extend beyond 2020.

Search ‘European and domestic funding after Brexit on www.gov.uk/brexit for more information.


Oct 30th for the IOC Middle England Brexit last-mile masterclass

IOC Brexit round table for express logistics, final mile, last mile.

At the Crowne Plaza, 55 Booth Street West, Manchester M15 6PQ

Lunch on arrival, 12.00 – 13.30 start for 16.00 finish.

What does it all mean and when will it happen?

Set your diary for Middle England and the IOC Last Mile Manchester masterclass on all things BREXIT, it is a must-attend and will be in the Express hotspot of Middle England on Oct 30th for a free-to-attend round table with the experts speaking to clarify where we are on borders, licence compliance and more.

Call Tracey Worth to reserve your place, 07976 263745

 


BREXIT Bubble evolves as the go-to final mile for Express courier

· Oct 31 to be or not to be in final mile, last mile Express courier talk.

· Oct 30 IOC Brexit last mile for Express courier event Manchester

· Motorway pop-ups for Brexit booklets

· IOC launch dedicated Express and final mile Brexit booklet


Departments across government are holding events to help your business get ready for Brexit

 

Pop-up Help for logistics to prepare for Brexit

The Department for Transport is setting up information pop-up stands across the UK and Europe to help transport and businesses prepare for Brexit, so that goods can continue to flow smoothly through ports. The pop-ups will be located at ports, service stations and on ferries to provide easily accessible advice, helping hauliers understand the documentation they need for themselves, their vehicles and their goods after Brexit. All stands will be staffed by multilingual advisors.

 

Brexit Helpline. New contact details

Today the Government has launched its Brexit Helpline giving additional information and guidance for businesses.

Full details of the Brexit Helpline can be found here


Operation Brock for KENT roads to the ports

IOC beat Parliament Super Saturday Oct 19th to bring you the Express Brexit Bubble on the Institute of Couriers' website a week ahead. A dedicated top-line bubble for Brexit that’s already been refreshed and all the news you need for express courier, final mile last mile Brexit. Britain’s anticipated withdrawal from the EU in the coming months means that businesses across the UK need to prepare. Throughout the rest of this month, IOC will be bringing you all the expertise and information resources you need, as we help Express final mile get Brexit Ready. Focusing on issues including driving licences, employment and immigration and getting ready for any changes in the tax and customs landscape. Hot off the Brexit Bubble news is Operation Brock.

 

Operation Brock to keep the M20 open in both directions

DfT Minister Chris Heaton-Harris says 'do not use sat nav.'

Kent roads ready for Brexit as hauliers gear up for the leave date

DfT Minister Chris Heaton-Harris, announced this week,

The final preparations to keep Britain moving after Brexit are taking place as traffic management preparations in Kent are stepped up. We want residents in Kent and Express couriers travelling from across the EU to be reassured that there are robust plans in place to deal with any disruption in the event of a no-deal Brexit.



Operation Brock will go live on Monday 28 October to manage any traffic disruption and help keep trade moving in and out of the UK. The government has worked closely with the Kent Resilience Forum to implement the scheme, which will manage any delays to Europe-bound freight while protecting local roads from disruption.

It will keep the M20 open in both directions for all other traffic, minimising any impacts on local residents, businesses and public services. This comes as the Department for Transport launches a targeted information campaign to ensure hauliers know what to expect if they are travelling to the Port of Dover or Eurotunnel in a no-deal Brexit scenario.

Express couriers driving during Operation Brock and heading to Europe via the Port of Dover or Eurotunnel will need to be on the Operation Brock routes and follow all diversions, instructions and speed restrictions rather than relying on satellite navigation systems.

Final works in the coming weeks will ensure that the holding areas are ready to be activated on October 28 as Operation Brock goes live.

This means that from 26-27 October there will be overnight closures on the M20 between junctions 7 and 9, so that final preparations can be carried out safely.

Once Operation Brock goes live on Monday 28 October, lorries heading for mainland Europe will need to use the coast bound carriageway of the M20 between junctions 8 and 9, with a 30mph speed limit in place.

All other traffic will run on the London-bound carriageway between these junctions, with two lanes in each direction operating at 50mph.

In addition, Highways England is fast-tracking work to ensure that key slip roads at a new junction being created on the M20 near Ashford will be open to traffic by the 31 October.


 

The UK Department for Transport's advice on Brexit is reproduced below


After Brexit there will be changes that affect businesses and hauliers across the UK.

Make sure you are prepared for them, particularly if your business:

· imports goods

· exports goods

· receives personal data

· exports services

Local business readiness events

The Department for Business is holding a series of free face-to-face Business Readiness Events across the UK, to help businesses find out what actions they need to take to prepare for Brexit. The events include support and advice stands, with in-depth sessions led by subject matter experts from across government, including Defra, HMRC, Home Office and DCMS.

You will find out more about a range of issues, including:

· the importing and exporting of goods and services

· transferring data

· employing EU citizens

Sign up to the events through the Brexit Business Readiness Events website.

Helping hauliers prepare for Brexit

The Department for Transport is setting up information pop-up stands across the UK and Europe to help hauliers and businesses prepare for Brexit, so that goods can continue to flow smoothly through ports.

The pop-ups will be located at ports, service stations and on ferries to provide easily accessible advice, helping hauliers understand the documentation they need for themselves, their vehicles and their goods after Brexit.

All stands will be staffed by multilingual advisors.

Further advice for hauliers is available on GOV.UK.

Brexit preparedness workshops for businesses that export

Businesses will leave these workshops with a personalised action plan for Brexit preparedness. The workshops will provide advice on:

· impact to supply chains

· changes to regulations and contracts

· where to find tariff information

· what businesses might need to speak to customers and employees about

Find your nearest event and sign up: please note that locations are still being added.

 

HMRC webinars to help customers get ready for Brexit

HMRC is running Get Ready for Brexit webinars during October, which provide an overview of everything UK businesses involved in the movement of goods between the EU and the UK need to know to keep goods moving after the leave date.

Sign up for one of the webinars at Get Ready for Brexit.

For those unable to make any of the sessions, the webinar has been recorded on GOV.UK


crossing the border to DEFRA for some more advice...


DEFRA Collection

Flowcharts for import and export processes after Brexit

The way you import to and export from the EU will change after Brexit. These flowcharts explain the new processes for certain goods and products.

Sign up for Defra alerts about Brexit and the trade sector

You can also read step-by-step guides on how to prepare your business for:

· exporting to the EU

· importing from the EU

Documents

1. Chemical exporters: steps to export chemicals to the EU after Brexit

2. Farmers and food producers: steps to export meat and dairy to the EU after Brexit

3. Farmers and food producers: steps to import meat and dairy from the EU after Brexit

4. Farmers and livestock exporters: steps to export live animals to the EU after Brexit

5. Fishermen: steps to land fishery products into the EU after Brexit

6. Livestock and poultry importers: steps to import livestock and poultry from the EU to the UK

7. Seafood exporters: steps to export fishery products to the EU after Brexit


For drivers and couriers who have been living outside the UK

 

Advice for UK nationals returning to live in the UK from the EU

The Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government (MHCLG) have provided advice for UK nationals previously living in the EU, who are returning to live in the UK after Brexit.

The advice includes information on benefits, healthcare, tax, bringing family members to the UK, housing, driving licenses, social care services, access to schooling and more.

Returning UK nationals can check eligibility requirements for any new benefit claims.